Part 2: Leadership, softball, and the theatre

Another thing I get from watching softball, (see “What can the arts learn from softball?”) is how all these egos can work toward one main goal: to play well and win the game. Yes, there are egos involved that may take a person to private goals such as striving for personal best statistics, but I think it is important to have a well-developed but realistic ego so you know what you are good at and where you need work. Yes, these sportswomen know they are excellent at this sport and part of their mission in life is to impart this fact to the rest of us in the world. Ego is a good thing, as long as you don’t get caught up in your own or anyone else’s drama that ego often generates. The ego is not you. It is only an indication of how you think of yourself.

What emerges from those whose ego takes them to something larger than how they played the last game, is to have some notion of keeping the game going. Not the individual game, but the whole notion of the game. In softball, it is important to win and to be the national champions and all that hoopla, but what is larger is that those watching are entertained enough to want to watch another game and then to watch next season and then to look forward to softball at the 2020 Olympics. Somebody, back in the day, thought more about football than college rivalries and so little by little, the NFL now hosts a huge audience and seeks to keep it as the all-American sport. Which, by the way, used to be baseball.

So our idea is to keep the theatre going. It has come this far, from back when cavemen might have enacted the day’s hunt, but there have always been times when some loudmouth declares “Theatre is dead!” It isn’t. It is still here because besides winning Tonys, the theatre people often see what they do as part of the larger picture: to keep the game of theatre going on. Tony awards, then, do more than give a person a statuette, it also celebrates the excellence in this conglomeration of arts and keeps moving it the bar upward and theatre, despite the terrifying ticket prices, is alive and well and thriving.

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